peacefulquiethero:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

littlestmowreader:

nivena:

sload:

gill-bear-toe:

gill-bear-toe:

someone-inconspicuous:

what the fuck is this shit

release the penguins

insert peanuts

are those ten fortes

I see two dinosaurs nuzzling each other.

EIGHT NOTE CHORDS? What instrument(s) is this for? An octopus??

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT

Places link and runs

This is going to bother me if I don’t say it neither of those songs are that piece of music. Neither of those are actually the death waltz. that is a piece of music called U.N. Owen Was Her?

peacefulquiethero:

tyleroakley:

witchhctiw:

the-solitary-witch:

warriorsatthedisco:

littlestmowreader:

nivena:

sload:

gill-bear-toe:

gill-bear-toe:

someone-inconspicuous:

what the fuck is this shit

release the penguins

insert peanuts

are those ten fortes

I see two dinosaurs nuzzling each other.

EIGHT NOTE CHORDS? What instrument(s) is this for? An octopus??

Its called the Death Waltz, and was written as a joke but people have attempted it on piano.

Saxes move downstage.

I’ll just leave this here.

SWEET JESUS CLICK THAT

Places link and runs

This is going to bother me if I don’t say it neither of those songs are that piece of music. Neither of those are actually the death waltz. that is a piece of music called U.N. Owen Was Her?

mafia-and-coloring-books:

image

"Umm, um…I guess they would if they didn’t have any, but…it’s not a lot of money. I, I don’t know…I just really wanted to have a contest with you, b-because you said I might win, so, so I thought that people like money and I didn’t really need it, so…so…so…”

"Some day you’re going to want that money you know. What if you wanted to get a surprise gift for someone? Even if you don’t necessarily want to use the money on yourself, you want to have it to at least do good things, don’t you? You need to save and make the best of your money."

mafia-and-coloring-books:

image

"It’s not really gambling because my dad will give it back to me next week. My allowance is a thousand yen a week, but he usually says I should save it. And I only turned blue once! It was really cool. I think it’s a super power." 

"That’s gambling and being irresponsible. That’s putting your entire income on the line for a whim. You should be more careful with your money. What do you think your father would do or think if he were to find out you lost all of it on a bet? You can’t simply trust someone else to be honest when it comes to finances either, don’t you think some people would cheat a little for that money?”

mafia-and-coloring-books:

image

"Why not? I’ve been practicing really hard! Look, look: if you beat me, then I’ll give you…I’ll give you…  a thousand yen!" 

"You’ve been practicing holding your breath? Have you just been around your family or at school breathing deeply and then just sitting there until you turn blue in the face? You should hold on to your money, and don’t start gambling like that."

mafia-and-coloring-books:

image

"I challenge you all to a breath-holding contest!" 

image

"You know… maybe that’s something you’d beat me at, Little Miss, but I don’t think I’ll be doing that."

Durarara Light Novel Translations

rinmatsuoka:

rinmatsuoka:

Since there’s been some confusion and I just found some translations for Novel 8 I thought I’d make a better master reference post for those interested in reading the Durarara Light Novels.

Please keep in mind these are all fantranslations
Also as an fyi the anime basically covers volumes 1-3 pretty well

Volume 1:

Volume 2:

Volume 3:

Volume 4:

Volume 5:

Volume 6:

Volume 7:

Volume 8:

Volume 9:

Volume 10:

Volume 11: 

  • Mizaya (Summary/snippets)
  • Note: Please refer to her my translation tag for more from Volume 11 and from Durarara Gaiden as not everything is linked on this one page. 

Volume 12:

Volume 13: [release date January 9th, 2014]

Durarara! SH

A year and a half after the end of the Dollars. The meeting of a boy, travelling to Ikebukuro in the capital to seek the Headless Rider, and a girl, whose older sister vanished chasing it; the extraordinary begins — ‘" -Popsiclete

Note: Please refer to Popsiclete’s post in regards to the meaning of SH (hint it’s not Shizuo Heiwajima.)

Extras:

  • Anni-Fiesta has translated alot of ‘extra’ stuff for Durarara such as the omake, DVD Extras, and CD content. If you dig through their livejournal you can find other things such as character card translations (likes/dislikes) and character name trivia . Lastly they were so wonderful as to make  a timeline for volumes 1-6 and a ‘How do Durarara characters refer to each other?’ doc that can be a life saver for any fanfic writers!
  • Popsiclete has posted a summary of all Durarara novels 1-12.

Ill update/reblog this post if I find anymore translations so please keep an eye out for that. Also be sure to thank the translators for all their hard work and if you have any questions I’ll be glad to help out as much as I can!

Other than that happy reading everyone!

Slightly big update with alot more translations from Popsiclete. I know this post is starting to become a dash stretcher but what better way to stretch your dash than with some Durarara novels?

I hope everyone’s pumped up for Season 2 in January!!

allthingslinguistic:

neurosciencestuff:

Try, try again? Study says no
When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults. Within months of living in a foreign country, a young child may speak a second language like a native speaker.
Brain structure plays an important role in this “sensitive period” for learning language, which is believed to end around adolescence. The young brain is equipped with neural circuits that can analyze sounds and build a coherent set of rules for constructing words and sentences out of those sounds. Once these language structures are established, it’s difficult to build another one for a new language.
In a new study, a team of neuroscientists and psychologists led by Amy Finn, a postdoc at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, has found evidence for another factor that contributes to adults’ language difficulties: When learning certain elements of language, adults’ more highly developed cognitive skills actually get in the way. The researchers discovered that the harder adults tried to learn an artificial language, the worse they were at deciphering the language’s morphology — the structure and deployment of linguistic units such as root words, suffixes, and prefixes.
“We found that effort helps you in most situations, for things like figuring out what the units of language that you need to know are, and basic ordering of elements. But when trying to learn morphology, at least in this artificial language we created, it’s actually worse when you try,” Finn says.
Finn and colleagues from the University of California at Santa Barbara, Stanford University, and the University of British Columbia describe their findings in the July 21 issue of PLoS One. Carla Hudson Kam, an associate professor of linguistics at British Columbia, is the paper’s senior author.
Too much brainpower
Linguists have known for decades that children are skilled at absorbing certain tricky elements of language, such as irregular past participles (examples of which, in English, include “gone” and “been”) or complicated verb tenses like the subjunctive.
“Children will ultimately perform better than adults in terms of their command of the grammar and the structural components of language — some of the more idiosyncratic, difficult-to-articulate aspects of language that even most native speakers don’t have conscious awareness of,” Finn says.
In 1990, linguist Elissa Newport hypothesized that adults have trouble learning those nuances because they try to analyze too much information at once. Adults have a much more highly developed prefrontal cortex than children, and they tend to throw all of that brainpower at learning a second language. This high-powered processing may actually interfere with certain elements of learning language.
“It’s an idea that’s been around for a long time, but there hasn’t been any data that experimentally show that it’s true,” Finn says.
Finn and her colleagues designed an experiment to test whether exerting more effort would help or hinder success. First, they created nine nonsense words, each with two syllables. Each word fell into one of three categories (A, B, and C), defined by the order of consonant and vowel sounds.
Study subjects listened to the artificial language for about 10 minutes. One group of subjects was told not to overanalyze what they heard, but not to tune it out either. To help them not overthink the language, they were given the option of completing a puzzle or coloring while they listened. The other group was told to try to identify the words they were hearing.
Each group heard the same recording, which was a series of three-word sequences — first a word from category A, then one from category B, then category C — with no pauses between words. Previous studies have shown that adults, babies, and even monkeys can parse this kind of information into word units, a task known as word segmentation.
Subjects from both groups were successful at word segmentation, although the group that tried harder performed a little better. Both groups also performed well in a task called word ordering, which required subjects to choose between a correct word sequence (ABC) and an incorrect sequence (such as ACB) of words they had previously heard.
The final test measured skill in identifying the language’s morphology. The researchers played a three-word sequence that included a word the subjects had not heard before, but which fit into one of the three categories. When asked to judge whether this new word was in the correct location, the subjects who had been asked to pay closer attention to the original word stream performed much worse than those who had listened more passively.
“This research is exciting because it provides evidence indicating that effortful learning leads to different results depending upon the kind of information learners are trying to master,” says Michael Ramscar, a professor of linguistics at the University of Tübingen who was not part of the research team. “The results indicate that learning to identify relatively simple parts of language, such as words, is facilitated by effortful learning, whereas learning more complex aspects of language, such as grammatical features, is impeded by effortful learning.”
Turning off effort
The findings support a theory of language acquisition that suggests that some parts of language are learned through procedural memory, while others are learned through declarative memory. Under this theory, declarative memory, which stores knowledge and facts, would be more useful for learning vocabulary and certain rules of grammar. Procedural memory, which guides tasks we perform without conscious awareness of how we learned them, would be more useful for learning subtle rules related to language morphology.
“It’s likely to be the procedural memory system that’s really important for learning these difficult morphological aspects of language. In fact, when you use the declarative memory system, it doesn’t help you, it harms you,” Finn says.
Still unresolved is the question of whether adults can overcome this language-learning obstacle. Finn says she does not have a good answer yet but she is now testing the effects of “turning off” the adult prefrontal cortex using a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation. Other interventions she plans to study include distracting the prefrontal cortex by forcing it to perform other tasks while language is heard, and treating subjects with drugs that impair activity in that brain region.

This reminds me of a recent discussion I had on twitter about learning languages by acquiring a bunch of vocab and then immersing yourself until your subconscious figures out the grammar for you. This study makes it sound like that would be a good idea. Much as I enjoy learning grammar, it’s not really conscious knowledge of grammar that enables you to talk fluently. 

allthingslinguistic:

neurosciencestuff:

Try, try again? Study says no

When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language that often elude adults. Within months of living in a foreign country, a young child may speak a second language like a native speaker.

Brain structure plays an important role in this “sensitive period” for learning language, which is believed to end around adolescence. The young brain is equipped with neural circuits that can analyze sounds and build a coherent set of rules for constructing words and sentences out of those sounds. Once these language structures are established, it’s difficult to build another one for a new language.

In a new study, a team of neuroscientists and psychologists led by Amy Finn, a postdoc at MIT’s McGovern Institute for Brain Research, has found evidence for another factor that contributes to adults’ language difficulties: When learning certain elements of language, adults’ more highly developed cognitive skills actually get in the way. The researchers discovered that the harder adults tried to learn an artificial language, the worse they were at deciphering the language’s morphology — the structure and deployment of linguistic units such as root words, suffixes, and prefixes.

“We found that effort helps you in most situations, for things like figuring out what the units of language that you need to know are, and basic ordering of elements. But when trying to learn morphology, at least in this artificial language we created, it’s actually worse when you try,” Finn says.

Finn and colleagues from the University of California at Santa Barbara, Stanford University, and the University of British Columbia describe their findings in the July 21 issue of PLoS One. Carla Hudson Kam, an associate professor of linguistics at British Columbia, is the paper’s senior author.

Too much brainpower

Linguists have known for decades that children are skilled at absorbing certain tricky elements of language, such as irregular past participles (examples of which, in English, include “gone” and “been”) or complicated verb tenses like the subjunctive.

“Children will ultimately perform better than adults in terms of their command of the grammar and the structural components of language — some of the more idiosyncratic, difficult-to-articulate aspects of language that even most native speakers don’t have conscious awareness of,” Finn says.

In 1990, linguist Elissa Newport hypothesized that adults have trouble learning those nuances because they try to analyze too much information at once. Adults have a much more highly developed prefrontal cortex than children, and they tend to throw all of that brainpower at learning a second language. This high-powered processing may actually interfere with certain elements of learning language.

“It’s an idea that’s been around for a long time, but there hasn’t been any data that experimentally show that it’s true,” Finn says.

Finn and her colleagues designed an experiment to test whether exerting more effort would help or hinder success. First, they created nine nonsense words, each with two syllables. Each word fell into one of three categories (A, B, and C), defined by the order of consonant and vowel sounds.

Study subjects listened to the artificial language for about 10 minutes. One group of subjects was told not to overanalyze what they heard, but not to tune it out either. To help them not overthink the language, they were given the option of completing a puzzle or coloring while they listened. The other group was told to try to identify the words they were hearing.

Each group heard the same recording, which was a series of three-word sequences — first a word from category A, then one from category B, then category C — with no pauses between words. Previous studies have shown that adults, babies, and even monkeys can parse this kind of information into word units, a task known as word segmentation.

Subjects from both groups were successful at word segmentation, although the group that tried harder performed a little better. Both groups also performed well in a task called word ordering, which required subjects to choose between a correct word sequence (ABC) and an incorrect sequence (such as ACB) of words they had previously heard.

The final test measured skill in identifying the language’s morphology. The researchers played a three-word sequence that included a word the subjects had not heard before, but which fit into one of the three categories. When asked to judge whether this new word was in the correct location, the subjects who had been asked to pay closer attention to the original word stream performed much worse than those who had listened more passively.

“This research is exciting because it provides evidence indicating that effortful learning leads to different results depending upon the kind of information learners are trying to master,” says Michael Ramscar, a professor of linguistics at the University of Tübingen who was not part of the research team. “The results indicate that learning to identify relatively simple parts of language, such as words, is facilitated by effortful learning, whereas learning more complex aspects of language, such as grammatical features, is impeded by effortful learning.”

Turning off effort

The findings support a theory of language acquisition that suggests that some parts of language are learned through procedural memory, while others are learned through declarative memory. Under this theory, declarative memory, which stores knowledge and facts, would be more useful for learning vocabulary and certain rules of grammar. Procedural memory, which guides tasks we perform without conscious awareness of how we learned them, would be more useful for learning subtle rules related to language morphology.

“It’s likely to be the procedural memory system that’s really important for learning these difficult morphological aspects of language. In fact, when you use the declarative memory system, it doesn’t help you, it harms you,” Finn says.

Still unresolved is the question of whether adults can overcome this language-learning obstacle. Finn says she does not have a good answer yet but she is now testing the effects of “turning off” the adult prefrontal cortex using a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation. Other interventions she plans to study include distracting the prefrontal cortex by forcing it to perform other tasks while language is heard, and treating subjects with drugs that impair activity in that brain region.

This reminds me of a recent discussion I had on twitter about learning languages by acquiring a bunch of vocab and then immersing yourself until your subconscious figures out the grammar for you. This study makes it sound like that would be a good idea. Much as I enjoy learning grammar, it’s not really conscious knowledge of grammar that enables you to talk fluently. 

myotakucorner:

Durarara!! Japanese playing cards

Not to be confused with Western playing cards (which have four suits of 13 cards each), Japanese playing cards have 12 suits with four cards each. Each suit represents a different month of the year, a different flower, and a different Special(s). In this case, they each also sport a different Durarara!! mascot. wiki source.

January - Pine - Crane & Sun - Akabayashi 

February - Plum Blossom - Bush-warbler - Shinra

March - Cherry Blossom - Camp Curtain - Akane 

April - Wisteria - Cuckoo - Celty

May - Iris - Water Iris - Dotachinn

June - Peony - Butterflies - Anri

July - Bush Clover - Boar - Kida

August - Susuki Grass - Full moon with red sky - Izaya

September - Chrysanthemum - Poetry sake cup - Shizuo

October - Maple - Deer - Mikado

November - Willow - Lightning/Swallow/Rainman with umbrella and frog - Simon

December - Paulownia - Chinese Phoenix - Shiki

M!A List [ All SFW ]

Honesty is the Best Policy: Muse cannot tell a lie for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Uninhibited: Muse says and does whatever they want without regard to the consequences for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Two Sides of the Same Coin: Muse is split into two different versions of themselves for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Timey-Wimey Stuff: Muse suddenly finds themselves in the past or the future [anon specifies which or when] for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Opposite Day: Muse says the opposite of what they mean for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Can you vague that up?: Muse must speak in riddles or vague terms for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
New Shakespeare: Everything the muse says must rhyme for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Dark Side: Muse is turned into a darker version of themselves for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Wings of an Angel: Muse suddenly has wings of an angel for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Intoxicated: Muse acts as if completely drunk for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Unfiltered: Muse says everything they think for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Invisible Man: Muse is invisible, can still be heard for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Tabula Rasa: Muse is afflicted with temporary amnesia. Whether they have forgotten part or all of their life is up to anon. Lasts for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Living Nightmares: Muse is plagued by hallucinations of their worst nightmares for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Mind Reader: Muse hears the thoughts of others for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Tag Along: Mun follows muse around for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
See No Evil: Muse is temporarily blinded for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Hear No Evil: Muse hears phantom voices for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Speak No Evil: Muse is unable to say anything remotely mean for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Narcolepsy: Muse falls asleep at the most random of times and must be awakened by someone else for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Songbird: Muse can only speak through song for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Confession: Muse confesses something they think or feel about everytime they talk to someone for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
Freaky Friday: Muse is now bodyswapped with (another muse or general character) for 24 hours or until [anon decides].
E